• Posted on: 22 February 2013
  • By: Editor

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Measuring Protease in Metalworking Fluids

  • Posted on: 1 October 2015
  • By: Editor

Measuring what? From Wikipedia (their drawing on the left): A protease (also called peptidase or proteinase) is any enzyme that performs proteolysis, that is, begins protein catabolism by hydrolysis of the peptide bonds that link amino acids together in a polypeptide chain. Proteases have evolved multiple times, and different classes of protease can perform the same reaction by completely different catalytic mechanisms. Proteases can be found in animals, plants, bacteria, archaea and viruses.

Day One: The Lost War Against Bacteria

  • Posted on: 29 September 2015
  • By: Editor

Michelle Rioux of Lonza Industrial Solutions finished her presentation "Metal Removal Biocides - What's Left?" at 3:00 PM on Day One of the ILMA conference. But for me, her message of doom was delivered much earlier. By 2:40, I understood clearly that there was no real hope for mankind. All is lost. There is no killing this stuff. Zombies? They're real. It's just a matter of time before the right bacteria species organize and figure out how to kill us all. The previous sessions enjoyed good attendance without overcrowding. This presentation was different.

Day One: Pure Water v Hard Water

  • Posted on: 29 September 2015
  • By: Editor

Pure Water v Hard Water. Well, a paper with that title wouldn't look so great on a resume so the official title was "The Tribological Effects of Metal Removal Fluids Diluted with Purified Water vs. Hard Water." So - hard water vs pure water - a no-brainer right? It's well known that as the hardness of the water increases, so does the number of issues with the metalworking fluid. Water makes up 80-97% of the metalworking fluid system. It's generally known that pure water increases the life of the metalworking fluid system. But that's not the end of the story.

Day One: Minimum Quantity Lubrication v Flood

  • Posted on: 28 September 2015
  • By: Editor

It's Day 1 at the 5th Metal Removals Conference. After the opening, I attended the first practitioner session titled "Minimum Quantity Lubrication vs. Traditional Flood Application - A Break-Through or Only for Niche Applications?" Presenter was Heinz Dwuletzki, PhD, and the head of R&D at Carl Bechem GmbH. The presentation was excellent and let me tell you, Dr. Dwuletzki knows his stuff. First, a brief history of MQL was provided, including definitions. A detailed study followed that outlined the critical pluses and minuses.

Register Now!

  • Posted on: 2 September 2015
  • By: Editor

Summer is over and its back to work for all of us, but there is much to look forward to. The most important international conference events in the metalworking fluid industry's history were the 4 International Conferences of Metal Removal Fluids presented by ILMA. The 5th conference is this month, in Chicago. Click the pic to register and we'll see you there.

The Sixth Floor Museum

  • Posted on: 18 May 2015
  • By: Editor

The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza chronicles the assassination and legacy of President John F. Kennedy; interprets the Dealey Plaza National Historic Landmark District and the John F. Kennedy Memorial Plaza; and presents contemporary culture within the context of presidential history. The Museum is located on the sixth and seventh floors of an early 20th-century warehouse formerly known as the Texas School Book Depository.

The Old Red Courthouse

  • Posted on: 16 May 2015
  • By: Editor

The Old Red Courthouse is one of two must see historical sites in Dallas. It's just really cool. Every county in Texas has the original courthouse unless it burnt down. Seems they all caught fire at least once. Some were set on fire by nefarious entities seeking to destroy records of deeds (Railroads..?). This should be on your TO DO list because it's cool, very close to the convention, and won't wear you out. You can walk there from the convention, take a long lunch and really enjoy this one. It goes unnoticed too often.